Philadelphia, United States Population

Population in Urban Area, now

5,722,172
  • World: 69th
  • North America: 10th
  • United States: 8th

Population in City Area, mid 2020

1,591,886
  • World: 162nd
  • North America: 10th
  • United States: 7th

Philadelphia Population Graphs

  • Urban Area
  • City Area

Philadelphia Population Review

Philadelphia is a city of 1.5 million people located in the state of Pennsylvania in the United States. It is located on the border of Pennsylvania and New Jersey along the coast of the Delaware River. It is the most populated county in Pennsylvania and the city itself is the eighth-largest metropolitan area, according to US statistics. The urban area of Philadelphia has 5.7 million people.

Philadelphia was founded in 1682 and is one of the oldest municipalities in the country. The city was instrumental in the American Revolution and it was the largest city in the country for many years until New York City overtook it in 1790. While it was no longer the largest city in the country, the city continued to grow exponentially. The population grew from 1 million to 3.1 million people from 1890 to 1950. Since then, the population has continued to grow steadily to its current population of 5.7 million people.

A city of firsts

Philadelphia is an important city for the United States and has been the location of many of the country’s “firsts”. These include the first library, medical school, hospital, stock exchange, zoo, business school, and national capital. It is the birthplace of the United States Marine Corps and the city contains 67 National Historic Landmarks and is the only World Heritage City in the United States. This makes Philadelphia a key cultural and historical location for the United States.

Rapidly gentrifying

Gentrification in Philadelphia has shaken many of the city’s neighbourhoods. A number of neighbourhoods surrounding the city’s downtown core have seen major changes as wealthy residents move in, including: North Philadelphia, Francisville, Northern Liberties, Fishtown, Kensington, Fairmount, Center City West, Hawthorne, and University City. Since 1949, the government has introduced many formal redevelopment projects that have forced community displacement of long-term residents, with many groups criticizing the heavy-handedness of these changes.

Many of the locations that were chosen for gentrification have shown a significant decline in black residents. On average, 750 black residents moved out of 16 or the 57 neighbourhoods chosen for focused redevelopment—and 770 white people moved in.

A diverse, but segregated city

Philadelphia is considered the fourth most segregated large city in all of the United States—it is also incredibly diverse. This is not an uncommon thing for large cities in the United States. Philadelphia’s citywide diversity index of 65.6% out of 100%, which puts it just off the most diverse city of New Jersey, with 75.5%. The population of the city is 41% black, 35% white, 13% Latino, and 7% Asian. However, most of these groups live in homogenous neighborhoods, with hyper-segregated regions that were victims of the city’s deeply racist redlining policies that are still leaving their mark today.

A strategic location

Philadelphia is a central city in the United States that has positioned itself as a business and entertainment mecca. Located between New York and Washington, DC, and within a two-hour flight of 60% of the population of the United States, Philadelphia is a key city on the eastern seaboard. There are 29 airlines in Philadelphia that offer 500 departures to 130 destinations non-stop, in the United States, and around the world.

A “knowledge capital”

Philadelphia is a highly educated city and has been named “One of Top 19 ‘Knowledge Capitals’ in USA and Europe by the Brookings Institution. It is home to the second largest university population in the U.S. and it has over 100 degree-granting institutions with 440,000 full and part-time students enrolled and over 90,000 degrees are awarded annually in the city. It is an important city for the life sciences community, with seven medical schools, 22 nursing schools, two dental schools, three colleges of pharmacy, a veterinary school, a school of optometry, a podiatry school, and 100 hospitals.

Review Updated: October 12, 2020

Philadelphia Urban Area Population History

1950 3,128,000
1951 3,201,000
1952 3,276,000
1953 3,352,000
1954 3,431,000
1955 3,511,000
1956 3,593,000
1957 3,677,000
1958 3,763,000
1959 3,851,000
1960 3,930,000
1961 3,975,000
1962 4,021,000
1963 4,067,000
1964 4,114,000
1965 4,161,000
1966 4,208,000
1967 4,257,000
1968 4,306,000
1969 4,355,000
1970 4,396,000
1971 4,410,000
1972 4,424,000
1973 4,438,000
1974 4,453,000
1975 4,467,000
1976 4,481,000
1977 4,496,000
1978 4,510,000
1979 4,525,000
1980 4,540,000
1981 4,558,000
1982 4,575,000
1983 4,593,000
1984 4,611,000
1985 4,629,000
1986 4,647,000
1987 4,665,000
1988 4,683,000
1989 4,701,000
1990 4,725,000
1991 4,767,000
1992 4,809,000
1993 4,852,000
1994 4,895,000
1995 4,938,000
1996 4,982,000
1997 5,026,000
1998 5,070,000
1999 5,115,000
2000 5,156,000
2001 5,185,000
2002 5,213,000
2003 5,242,000
2004 5,271,000
2005 5,301,000
2006 5,330,000
2007 5,359,000
2008 5,389,000
2009 5,419,000
2010 5,449,000
2011 5,479,000
2012 5,510,000
2013 5,540,000
2014 5,571,000
2015 5,602,000
2016 5,633,000
2017 5,664,000
2018 5,695,000
2019 5,705,000
2020 5,717,000

Philadelphia Urban Area Population Projections

2021 5,734,000
2022 5,756,000
2023 5,785,000
2024 5,821,000
2025 5,861,000
2026 5,907,000
2027 5,956,000
2028 6,008,000
2029 6,061,000
2030 6,114,000
2031 6,168,000
2032 6,221,000
2033 6,274,000
2034 6,326,000
2035 6,378,000

City Area Population Estimate & Projections

2010 1,528,293
2011 1,540,322
2012 1,551,797
2013 1,558,371
2014 1,565,604
2015 1,571,258
2016 1,576,390
2017 1,580,221
2018 1,584,138
2019 1,588,012
2020 1,591,886

Map of Philadelphia, United States

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